About This Artist

Eisa Jocson is a contemporary choreographer and dancer from the Philippines. Originally trained as a visual artist, she won her first pole-dancing competition in Manila in 2010, and started pole ‘tagging’ and other public interventions in Manhattan and various cities.

Since then, Jocson has developed a powerful body of work that takes a fresh perspective on the commodification of the laboring body. CounterPulse, in collaboration with SFMOMA, will be presenting the entire suite of works in one weekend, Death of Pole Dancer, Macho Dancer, and the North American premiere of Host.

 

About This Project

From pole dancing to macho dancing, Eisa Jocson investigates the labour and representations of the dancing body in the service industry, and exposes gender formation, seduction politics, and Filipino social mobility.

In the double billed evening of works on Friday and Saturday, Death of the Pole Dancer interrogates the way we look at what we think we look at. The audience is brought to reflect on what they witness: a woman during the act of pole dancing. The performance renegotiates notions such as voyeurism and restrain, vulnerability and violence, sexuality and power.

Macho Dancer, explores the specific movement vocabulary and physicality of this form that is a unique phenomenon in the Philippines. Macho dancing is an economically-motivated language of seduction that employs masculinity as body capital. By framing a woman’s body in the act, Jocson challenges our perception of sexuality and questions gender as a tool for social mobility.

Join us Sunday for the North American premiere of Jocson’s Host,visiting the hostess clubs of Tokyo, where Filipino female and transgender hostesses engage in ‘affective labour’ by performing a version of femininity that caters to Japanese salary men. These hostesses employ mimetic strategies and hybrid identities to survive and succeed. It is in this role that we first discover Jocson: she is our host, receiving and entertaining the audience as guests. Host invites us to experience and reflect on feminine image formation by displaying forms of entertainment strategies associated with femininity and by exhibiting labor and body politics.

Upcoming Events

Support the Springboard Fund for Artists

She-Verse and mouth//full

Cherie Hill IrieDance and Gabriel Christian & Chibueze Crouch
Thu-Sat, Dec 5-7 & 12-14, 7:45pm-9pm

S l o w D a n c e

Hana Erdman
Thu-Fri, Dec 19-20, 8pm

TVOD Winter Solstice Underground

Sat-Sun, Dec 21-22, 10pm-4am

Archived Events

Tenderloin Women’s Holiday Party

Central City SRO Collaborative, Care Through Touch, La Cocina
Mon, Dec 9, 12pm-2pm

Came Here To Live: Resilience and Resistance in the Containment Zone

ABD Productions & The Skywatchers Ensemble
Fri-Sun, Nov 22-24. Fri-Sat, 7:30pm, Sun 2pm matinee

tiny little get down

tinypistol + little seismic dance company
Fri, Nov 15, 7:30pm-9:30pm

DIY T-Shirt Fashion Design

Sylvester Guard Jr.
Fri, Nov 15, 3-5pm // Sun, Mar 15, 3-5pm

Blog Roll

  • Figuring it Out: Inside She-Verse’s Narrative

    In 2006, I hosted my first audition for Cherie Hill IrieDance performers. I desired an all-black female cast. I yearned to deepen my self-knowledge of being a black woman making dance and to analytically understand how aesthetics relate to white and black culture. In 2014, I looked for something different. I sought movers who could […]

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  • She-Verse Movement Essences

      She-verse embraces tenants of eco-feminism that speak to the parallels between oppression and domination of subordinate groups to the oppression and dominance of nature. How women are treated in misogynistic cultures relates to the abuse and rape of land experienced throughout the history of colonization and to the continued subordination of women and persons […]

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  • Fake News and the Art of Unremembering

    Who here has heard of Singapore? Who here knows where it is? Who here knows anything about it?   I concede that answers to these questions might have changed since the popularity of the movie “Crazy Rich Asians”, but by and large, as a Singaporean living in the USA, I usually expect the response to […]

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